Mack's letter made it clear that MultiChoice wanted key powers guaranteed by parts of the Electronic Communications Act to be transferred back to Muthambi.

"Broadcasting is regulated by the Electronic Communications Act, 2005 (Act No 36 of 2005). The ability to make broadcasting policy and issue broadcasting policy directions are set out in section 3 of this Act. These powers have been transferred from the Minister of Communications to the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services," Mack stated.

"It is therefore the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Service [Cwele] who will make policy and issue policy directives to Icasa for broadcasting, including public service broadcasting," Mack added.

Muthambi lobbies the Guptas

Over the course of the next few months, Muthambi would send Chawla four other documents relating to broadcasting policy. Chawla forwarded most of these to Tony Gupta and Duduzane Zuma, the president's son.

On July 25, Muthambi sent Chawla a Word document called "proclamtion [sic] new 18 July 2014".

MultiChoice has admitted that this document was also penned by Mack.

Chawla forwarded the document to Tony Gupta and Duduzane Zuma on the same day. The document stipulated in detail which aspects of the Electronic Communications Act Muthambi wanted to be moved from Cwele back to her.

"These sections must be transferred to the Minister of Communications," Muthambi wrote to Chawla.

The document specifically focused on the parts of the Act dealing with the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa), one of the key government bodies involved in the digital television migration process.

Muthambi also sent Chawla a Word document called "Responsibility for Infraco and Sentech" on July 25, adding in her email that "Sentech's signal distribution must rest with the Ministry of Communications". 

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